Computer-Mediated Communication

As I focus on cyberbullying and cyberbystander behavior, the majority of my research falls in the category computer-mediated communication. I aim to apply key CMC theories to explain why cyberbystanders choose to intervene (or not intervene), and what communication strategies are employed in any intervention. I employ a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods in my experiments and studies. Listed below are some current research projects at various stages. My dissertation is now available for download as well.

Unresponsive or un-noticed? Cyberbystander intervention in an experimental cyberbullying context

Status: Published in Computers in Human Behavior, 45, 144-150.
Conference: Presented at the 100th Annual Conference of the National Communication Association’s (November 2014), Communication & Technology Division, High Density Paper Session.

Testing Step 2 of the Bystander Intervention Model: Instigating interpretation of online events by varying victim communication in cyberbullying situations

Status: Under preparation
Conference: Presented at the 101st Annual Conference of the National Communication Association (November 2015), Human Communication & Technology Division, Las Vegas, NV.

The Cyberbystander Intervention Model: A proposed theoretical model explaining cyberbystander intervention and the social impact of mediated messages to peripheral receivers

Status: Under preparation
Conference: Updated model  presented at the 16th Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers (October 2015), Phoenix, AZ.
Conference: Preliminary model presented in a poster session at the 100th Annual Conference of the National Communication Association (November, 2014), Rhetoric Division, Chicago, IL.

Civil keystrokes: Examining anonymity, politeness, and civility in online newspaper forums

Collaborators: Rachel L. Neo (PhD Candidate, OSU, 2015) & Natalee Seely (PhD Student, UNC-Chapel Hill)
Status: Under review
Conference: To be presented at the 16th Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers (October 2015), Phoenix, AZ.

Hacking Technology to Incorporate Writing into Undergraduate Courses

Conference: Presented at the 101st Annual Conference of the National Communication Association (November 2015), Panel in the Human Communication & Technology Division, Las Vegas, NV.

Surveilling the standing by: An experimental design to test cyberbystander behavior

Status: Under preparation

Empathy or admonishment: The effect of cyberbystander communication in creating normative responses to cyberbullying

Collaborators: Grace Ahn, PhD (University of Georgia)
Status: Data collection

Just one of the gang: The effects of multiple identities on cyberbystanders

Collaborators: Mao Vang (PhD Candidate, OSU, 2015)
Status: Data collection

 

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